Book Review: Watchmen of Rome by Alex Gough

Watchmen of Rome takes the reader to the mean streets of Ancient Rome during the reign of Tiberius. Elissa is a priestess of the Carthaginian deities Baal-Hammon and Tanit, having received training from her mother, religious lore passed down in secret since the destruction of Carthage some 180 years before. She has a plan to [...]

New Review of The Death of Carthage by Marcus Metius, AKA Alex Johnston

http://www.unrv.com/book-review/the-death-of-carthage.php The Death of Carthage by Robin E. Levin Book Review by MarcusMettius Good historical fiction is a two-fer. You can get the facts by reading Polybius and Livy. But you need a Robin Levin to introduce you to Marcus Nemo Nemonides (Marcus Nobody, son of Nobody) – I just love that name! Yep – [...]

Excerpt #4 From my Work in Progress, In the Wake of Hannibal

In order to save his infant son from being sacrificed as a burn offering, Gisco has fled to the Romans and has offered his services as a traitor: After a few weeks I was summoned to the tablinum of the owner of the domus. Lucius was there and alongside him sat two stern-looking middle-aged men [...]

Excerpt #3 My Work in Progress The Last Carthaginian Part 1:In The Wake of Hannibal

Hannibal’s brother Mago is not pleased that Indibal the priest of Tanit and Ba-al Hammon has demanded the sacrifice of his bast friend Gisco’s child, compelling Gisco to desert to the Romans. It had been a week since Gisco had gone to Khart Hadasht and he had still not returned. This was not like Gisco. [...]

Another Excerpt from My Work In Progress The Last Carthaginian. Part 1, In the Wake of Hannibal

To avoid having his infant son sacrificed as a burnt offering to the Goddess Tanit and the God Ba-al Hammon, Gisco has fled New Carthage with his wife, three small children and two freed slaves. He faces down a delegation from New Carthage intending to persuade him to return, and travels safely to Roman territory. [...]

Excerpt from My Forthcoming Book The Last Carthaginian

From The Last Carthaginian, part one: In the Wake of Hannibal. Gisco is told by the high priest of Tanit and Baal-Hammon that his infant son must be sacrificed as a burnt offering to the gods. In winter I returned to Khart Hadasht to find Sansara big with child. Within a month she had our [...]

Book Review: Warhorn by J. Glenn Bauer

Warhorn, as the name suggests, is a war story. The novel is past paced, exciting and graphic, with great amounts of blood and gore and intricate battle details. The novel takes place around the year 219 B.C. in Carthaginian-ruled Spain, just before the start of the Second Punic War between Carthage and Rome. Carthage has [...]

What Was the Attitude of the Ancients Toward War?

How did the peoples of the ancient world regard war? Did they glory in it, or did they consider it a necessary evil. Did everyone in those days agree that “Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori?” A bit of research would indicate that the attitude, at least of the educated ancients, was ambivalent to [...]

Book Review: The Carthaginians by Dexter Hoyos

The Carthaginians is the most thoroughly researched and comprehensive book I have read about the Carthaginian civilization and its history. Dexter Hoyos draws upon both archeology and ancient writings to produce as complete a portrait of ancient Carthage and it’s sphere of influence as possible, and in so doing he dispels or brings into question [...]

Scipio Africanus, Rome’s Greatest General

Richard Gabriel is a military historian and his strength lies in his thorough understanding of military history, strategy, tactics and logistics. In Scipio Africanus Gabriel thoroughly analyses Scipio’s military campaigns in Spain and Africa and gets into details that will fascinate students of military history. For example he shows that, based on logistics it would [...]