Excerpt from My Forthcoming Book The Last Carthaginian

From The Last Carthaginian, part one: In the Wake of Hannibal. Gisco is told by the high priest of Tanit and Baal-Hammon that his infant son must be sacrificed as a burnt offering to the gods. In winter I returned to Khart Hadasht to find Sansara big with child. Within a month she had our [...]

Book Review: Warhorn by J. Glenn Bauer

Warhorn, as the name suggests, is a war story. The novel is past paced, exciting and graphic, with great amounts of blood and gore and intricate battle details. The novel takes place around the year 219 B.C. in Carthaginian-ruled Spain, just before the start of the Second Punic War between Carthage and Rome. Carthage has [...]

What Was the Attitude of the Ancients Toward War?

How did the peoples of the ancient world regard war? Did they glory in it, or did they consider it a necessary evil. Did everyone in those days agree that “Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori?” A bit of research would indicate that the attitude, at least of the educated ancients, was ambivalent to [...]

Book Review: The Carthaginians by Dexter Hoyos

The Carthaginians is the most thoroughly researched and comprehensive book I have read about the Carthaginian civilization and its history. Dexter Hoyos draws upon both archeology and ancient writings to produce as complete a portrait of ancient Carthage and it’s sphere of influence as possible, and in so doing he dispels or brings into question [...]

Scipio Africanus, Rome’s Greatest General

Richard Gabriel is a military historian and his strength lies in his thorough understanding of military history, strategy, tactics and logistics. In Scipio Africanus Gabriel thoroughly analyses Scipio’s military campaigns in Spain and Africa and gets into details that will fascinate students of military history. For example he shows that, based on logistics it would [...]

Book Review: Total War. Destroy Carthage by David Gibbons

I knew I was in trouble when I read the dramatis personae of this book and found that Scipio Aemilianus was married to a fictional person named Claudia Pulchra (or Pulchradina, as the author puts it.) It is well known that Scipio Aemilianus was married to Sempronia Graccha, the daughter of Cornelia the Mother of [...]

Whatever Happened to Hannibal’s Elephants?

In ancient times there was widespread use of elephants in warfare. The first use of elephants in military campaigns probably occurred in India sometime during the first millennium B.C. The practice eventually spread eastward to Burma, Thailand, Cambodia and Laos, and westward to Greece and North Africa. In 326 B.C. Alexander the Great invaded India, [...]

Book Review: Hannibal: A History of the Art of War by Theodore Ayrault Dodge

Theodore Ayrault Dodge was a military historian who was born in 1842 and died in 1909. He fought as a Union officer in the American Civil War and wrote a number of biographies of history’s most famous generals, including Alexander the Great, Hannibal Barca, Julius Caesar, Gustavus Adolphus, Frederick the Great and Napoleon Bonaparte. In [...]

Book Review:For the Love of Ireland by Judy Lelsie

Much like the union between England and Ireland, the marriage of Margaret Sullivan and Alexander Sullivan was the proverbial “marriage made in Hell.” Margaret is a feisty and independent woman who defies the conventions of the late 19th century by having a career as a journalist for the Chicago Tribune. She married Alex with the [...]

What Shakespeare Owes to Plautus

Last Friday I was walking through New York’s Central Park on my way to the Metropolitan Museum of Art when I passed the Delacorte Theater. There was a long line of people there and I inquired as to why they were standing there. They told me that the theater was giving out free tickets to [...]