Book Review: Darkness Over Cannae by Jenny N. Dolfen

Darkness Over Cannae is a work of art, in both the literary and the pictorial senses. It is lush with strikingly rendered illustrations, created by the author herself, which bring to life the sights one might have witnessed before, during, and after the battle. In Darkness over Cannae, Jenny Dolfen tells the story of the [...]

Book Review, Outlander of Rome by Ken Farmer

I would hesitate to recommend this book to serious readers of historical fiction as some of the historical inaccuracies would make one grind one’s teeth, or perhaps explode into paroxysms of laughter. I think, however, that the author knows his history and that the inaccuracies are intentional. He’s putting the reader on, perhaps out of [...]

Book Review: Las Legiones Malditas by Santiago Postaguillo

Las Legiones Malditas (The Accursed Legions) is the second in a series of three novels by Santiago Postaguillo about the life of Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus, the conqueror of Carthage in the Second Punic War. The books are written in Spanish with no English translation available, but if your Spanish is up to the task, [...]

New Review of The Death of Carthage by Marcus Metius, AKA Alex Johnston

http://www.unrv.com/book-review/the-death-of-carthage.php The Death of Carthage by Robin E. Levin Book Review by MarcusMettius Good historical fiction is a two-fer. You can get the facts by reading Polybius and Livy. But you need a Robin Levin to introduce you to Marcus Nemo Nemonides (Marcus Nobody, son of Nobody) – I just love that name! Yep – [...]

Excerpt #4 From my Work in Progress, In the Wake of Hannibal

In order to save his infant son from being sacrificed as a burn offering, Gisco has fled to the Romans and has offered his services as a traitor: After a few weeks I was summoned to the tablinum of the owner of the domus. Lucius was there and alongside him sat two stern-looking middle-aged men [...]

Excerpt #3 My Work in Progress The Last Carthaginian Part 1:In The Wake of Hannibal

Hannibal’s brother Mago is not pleased that Indibal the priest of Tanit and Ba-al Hammon has demanded the sacrifice of his bast friend Gisco’s child, compelling Gisco to desert to the Romans. It had been a week since Gisco had gone to Khart Hadasht and he had still not returned. This was not like Gisco. [...]

Another Excerpt from My Work In Progress The Last Carthaginian. Part 1, In the Wake of Hannibal

To avoid having his infant son sacrificed as a burnt offering to the Goddess Tanit and the God Ba-al Hammon, Gisco has fled New Carthage with his wife, three small children and two freed slaves. He faces down a delegation from New Carthage intending to persuade him to return, and travels safely to Roman territory. [...]

Excerpt from My Forthcoming Book The Last Carthaginian

From The Last Carthaginian, part one: In the Wake of Hannibal. Gisco is told by the high priest of Tanit and Baal-Hammon that his infant son must be sacrificed as a burnt offering to the gods. In winter I returned to Khart Hadasht to find Sansara big with child. Within a month she had our [...]

Book Review: The Carthaginians by Dexter Hoyos

The Carthaginians is the most thoroughly researched and comprehensive book I have read about the Carthaginian civilization and its history. Dexter Hoyos draws upon both archeology and ancient writings to produce as complete a portrait of ancient Carthage and it’s sphere of influence as possible, and in so doing he dispels or brings into question [...]

Scipio Africanus, Rome’s Greatest General

Richard Gabriel is a military historian and his strength lies in his thorough understanding of military history, strategy, tactics and logistics. In Scipio Africanus Gabriel thoroughly analyses Scipio’s military campaigns in Spain and Africa and gets into details that will fascinate students of military history. For example he shows that, based on logistics it would [...]