Book Review. Hannibal by Patrick N. Hunt

Patrick N. Hunt’s Hannibal is a clear, concise and highly readable account of the life of Hannibal the events of the Second Punic War (218-202 BC) Hannibal’s attack on Rome was clearly rooted in the outcome of the first Punic War and the anger that Hannibal’s father, Hamilcar Barca, felt toward Rome. He raised his [...]

Book Review: Salammbo by Gustave Flaubert

The twenty-three year long war with Rome is finally over. Carthage has been defeated and the once wealthy city is depleted of funds. What to do about the mercenaries? They must somehow be paid. The Suffetes decide to appease them by giving them a grand banquet at the property of the immensely wealthy general Hamilcar, [...]

Book Review: The Fall of Carthage by Adrian Goldsworthy

Reading ancient Historians like Livy and Polybius is enlightening and fascinating for anyone who wants to get an understanding of how people saw the world in ancient times, but it can be slow going. Livy frequently goes into long discourses about prodigies that were seen at critical times and the religious rites that were undertaken [...]

The Moral Decline of Ancient Rome

The period of the Punic Wars was a critical time in the history of Western civilizaition. They saw the rise of Rome as the dominant power in the civilized world and, no less important, its concomitant moral decline. From its beginnings under its founder Romulus, Rome had always been a warlike society and its history [...]

Book Review: The Sword of Carthage by Vaughn Heppner

Melquarth portrait on Phoenecian Coin

                                       The Sword of Carthage     The Sword of Carthage, by Vaughn Heppner, tells a tale of the first Punic war through the eyes of Hamilcar Barca, the father of Hannibal. In writing The Death of Carthage, my novel of the second and third Punic wars, I naturally tried to learn all I could [...]