The Last Carthaginian is Now Available on Amazon and Kindle

I have just published the third in my series of historical novels about the Second and Third Punic Wars between Rome and Carthage. The Death of Carthage told the story of the Second and Third Punic Wars from the point of view of the Romans. In the Wake of Hannibal told the story of the [...]

Book Review: Mediterranean Anarchy, Interstate Warfare, and the Rise of Rome by Arthur M. Eckstein

This book is for serious students of ancient Rome and its place in antiquity, for those who desire a deeper understanding of the cultural, social, economic and political dynamics of the ancient Mediterranean world that Rome came to dominate, and an insight into how and why Rome came to rule over this entire region. The [...]

Book Review: Taken At the Flood; The Roman Conquest of Greece, by Robin Waterfield

Ph In my research about the third Punic war, the one in which Rome destroyed Carthage, I ran across an intriguing quote by the Greek historian Polybius. “The ruin of Carthage is indeed considered to have been the greatest of calamities, but when we come to think of it the fate of Greece was no [...]

Did the Carthaginians Actually Practice Child Sacrifice?

In my work in progress, The Death of Carthage, my protagonist, Gisco, is informed by Indibal, the priest of Tanit and Ba-al Hammon that he must surrender his five month old son, Hanno, to be sacrificed to the gods. Aghast, Gisco seeks to avoid the sacrifice by taking his wife and three children to Roman [...]

Legionary: The Roman Soldier’s (Unofficial) Manual by Philip Matyszak

Anyone writing historical fiction or non-fiction about ancient Rome would do well to read Legionary, the Roman Soldier’s (Unofficial) Manual. This book tells all of the ins and outs of the Roman army-recruitment, training, gear, working conditions, benefits and drawbacks, possible assignments and promotion opportunities, various places you may be sent to, characteristics of possible [...]

Book Review: Total War. Destroy Carthage by David Gibbons

I knew I was in trouble when I read the dramatis personae of this book and found that Scipio Aemilianus was married to a fictional person named Claudia Pulchra (or Pulchradina, as the author puts it.) It is well known that Scipio Aemilianus was married to Sempronia Graccha, the daughter of Cornelia the Mother of [...]

My new book, Sempronia the Sister of the Gracchi is Now Available on Amazon

My second book, Sempronia, the Sister of the Gracchi, has just been published by Create Space. This is a  short work which tells the story of Tiberius and Gaius Gracchus, Roman reformers of the second century B.C., through the eyes of their sister Sempronia. Sempronia is described by ancient historians as “unlovely, unloving, and unloved.”  [...]

Book Review: The Party is Over by Mike Lofgren

Polybius, the Greek historian

For who is so worthless or indolent as not to wish to know by what means and under what system of polity the Romans in less than fifty-three years have succeeded in subjecting nearly the whole inhabited world to their sole government, a thing unique in history? Or who again is there so passionately devoted [...]

Notable Women of The Roman Republic-Aemilia Paulla

                        Notable Women of the Roman Republic: Aemilia Paulla   Lucius Aemilius Paullus was one of the two Roman Consuls in 216 B.C. when the disastrous battle of Cannae took place. Killed in the battle, he left a widow and at least two young children. His son, Lucius Aemilius Paullus was born around 228 B.C., [...]