Book Review: The Invention of Yesterday by Tamim Ansary

  For anyone who wants to understand the past and how it has shaped the present, The Invention of Yesterday is a must read. Tamim Ansary traces human history back to the invention of true language. Other animals, such a dogs and apes can, if taught, associate words with objects, but, according to Ansary, “True […]

How Does the Political System in Ancient Rome Differ from That of Modern Day America

How was Roman democracy different from American democracy? Robin Levin, The Roman Republic was not a democracy. It was a plutocratic oligarchy. And the U.S. Republic is also not a true democracy, it is also a plutocratic oligarchy. The Greek historian Polybius, lived in the second century B.C. and spent seventeen years as a hostage […]

Book Review: Kings, Conquerors, Psychopaths by Joseph N. Abraham

If you are at all interested in politics and in the future of our country and, indeed, the future of mankind, this may be the most important book you will ever read. Dr. Abraham delved into human history and reveals that, since the dawn of civilization, we have been generally been ruled by what he […]

Book Review: Democracy in Chains by Nancy MacLean

Democracy in Chains by Nancy MacLean How is it that a party that only 26% of American voters belong to has come to control most of our state governments and all branches of the Federal Government? Nancy MacLean, in her book Democracy in Chain describes a long term and effective movement to undermine democracy in […]

Book Review: Feast of Sorrow by Crystal King

Feast of Sorrow is a brilliant work of Historical fiction which seamlessly interweaves fictional and historical characters and, in addition, provides an insight into how the Romans conducted their famous feasts, what foods they ate and how they were prepared. Apicius was a famous gourmand of first century A.D. Rome, the beginning of the Julio-Claudian […]

Book Review. Hannibal by Patrick N. Hunt

Patrick N. Hunt’s Hannibal is a clear, concise and highly readable account of the life of Hannibal the events of the Second Punic War (218-202 BC) Hannibal’s attack on Rome was clearly rooted in the outcome of the first Punic War and the anger that Hannibal’s father, Hamilcar Barca, felt toward Rome. He raised his […]

Book Review: Surviving The Fatherland by Annette Oppenlander

If nearly all of your relatives in Europe died in massacres and concentration camps your natural reaction when reading of the suffering of Germans during and after World War Two, might reasonably be “As ye sow, so shall ye reap.” Looking at these events from a broader perspective, however, one sees that Germans were also […]

Book Review: Emperor: The Gates of Rome by Conn Iggulden

Conn Iggulden is a top notch novelist and The Gates of Rome is fast paced and absorbing. It is the story of young Julius Caesar, his arduous training for the rigors of the Roman soldiery and his early involvement in Roman politics at the side of his Uncle Marius. Maybe it’s just me, but I […]

Book Review: Pillar of Iron by Taylor Caldwell

Taylor Caldwell was born in 1900 and was one of the 20th century’s most acclaimed novelists. She published forty books during her 50 year career. She was a favorite of my mother, but, although her books were certainly available in my high school library, I somehow never chanced to read any of them. When I […]

Book Review: Iron and Rust by Harry Sidebottom

“Enrich the soldiers and ignore everyone else.” This was the maxim of Emperor Maximinus’ mentor, the Emperor Caracalla. It seemed like good advice as an emperor generally attained and maintained power at the behest of his troops. Unfortunately, Emperor Maximinus, who came to power in the coup that assassinated the Emperor Alexander Severus and his […]